SAE World Series softball tournament.

2020 SAE World Series bracket.
2020 SAE World Series bracket.
Tournament dedicated to the memory of SAE great Jim Pope. Pictured here is tournament founder with members of Jim Pope's family.
Tournament dedicated to the memory of SAE great Jim Pope. Pictured here is tournament founder with members of Jim Pope's family.

The 35th annual SAE World Series softball tournament was held on Friday Nov. 13th 2020.

 

Val Riess Park

1101 Magistrate St.

Chalmette, LA 70043

 

 

Annual softball tournament in New Orleans, La. 

Open to all active and alumni members.

10 man teams. 

Double elimination format.

Professional umpires. 

Saturday night awards banquet with cash bar and free cajun, creole buffet.

          Call Geary at 504 782 6812 or Ron at 504 906 7484 to register your team or for more information.

Sae World Series softball tournament.
Lsu repeats for 2020 SAE World Series champions.
Sae World Series softball tournament.
2020 2nd place SAE World Series team Nicholls state alums.

Actives and alumni can play on the same team. SAE's from different chapters can also play on the same team. 

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New Orleans alumni association of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

Steve Birk from S. Florida alumns. Steve and his team have attended approximately 24 years.
Steve Birk from S. Florida alumns. Steve and his team have attended approximately 24 years.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ), commonly known as SAE, is a North American Greek-letter social college fraternity. It was founded at the University of Alabama on March 9, 1856. Of all existing national social fraternities today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only one founded in the Antebellum South.[2] Its national headquarters, the Levere Memorial Temple, was established on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, in 1929. The fraternity's mission statement is "To promote the highest standards of friendship, scholarship and service for our members based upon the ideals set forth by our Founders and as specifically enunciated in our creed."[3]

The fraternity has chapters and colonies in 50 states and provinces as of 2011.[4] The creed of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, The True Gentleman, must be memorized and recited by all prospective members. New members receive a copy of The Phoenix, the manual of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, for educational development.[5] 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded on March 9, 1856, at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.[2] Its founders were Noble Leslie DeVotieNathan Elams Cockrell, Samuel Marion Dennis, John Barrett Rudulph, Abner Edwin Patton, Wade Hampton Foster, Thomas Chappell Cook and John Webb Kerr. Their leader was DeVotie, who wrote the ritual, created the grip, and chose the name. Rudulph designed the fraternity badge. Of all existing national social fraternities today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only national fraternity founded in the Antebellum South.[9]

Founded in a time of intense sectional feeling, Sigma Alpha Epsilon confined its growth to the southern states. By the end of 1857, the fraternity numbered seven chapters. Its first national convention met in the summer of 1858 at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, with four of its eight chapters in attendance. By the time of the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, fifteen chapters had been established.

None of the founders of SAE were members of any other fraternity, although Noble Leslie DeVotie had been invited to join all of the other fraternities at the University of Alabama before founding Sigma Alpha Epsilon.[10]

The Founders of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

The fraternity had fewer than 400 members when the Civil War began. Of those, 369 went to war for the Confederate States and seven for the Union Army. Seventy-four members of the fraternity lost their lives in the war.

Fraternal history notes that Noble Leslie DeVotie was the first person to die in the Civil War, this is in dispute. DeVotie lost his footing while boarding a steamer at Fort Morgan, Alabama, on February 12, 1861, hit his head and drowned. His body washed ashore three days later. Because Alabama had already seceded from the Union in January of that year, DeVotie is viewed by many to be the first casualty of the war. He is recognized as such by the state of Alabama.

After the Civil War, only one chapter survived – at tiny Columbian College (which is now George Washington University) in Washington, D.C..

When a few of the young veterans returned to the Georgia Military Institute and found their college burned to the ground, they decided to enter the University of Georgia in AthensGeorgia. The founding of a chapter there at the end of 1865, along with the re-establishment of the chapter at the University of Virginia, led to the fraternity's revival. Soon, other chapters came back to life and, in 1867, the first post-war convention was held at Nashville, Tennessee, where a half-dozen revived chapters planned the fraternity's future growth.

In the 1870s and early 1880s, more than a score of new chapters were formed. Older chapters died as fast as new ones were established. By 1886, the fraternity had chartered 49 chapters, but few were active. The first northern chapter had been established at Pennsylvania College (now Gettysburg College), in 1883, and a second was placed at Mount Union College in Ohio two years later.